Showing posts with label crowdsourcing. Show all posts
Showing posts with label crowdsourcing. Show all posts

Thursday, May 31, 2018

New article out in the International Journal of Communication

I am thrilled by this new article with my former Master's student Linnea Thompson, one of the brightest students I have come across over these years. A dream collaboration which went smoothly and resulted in a publication with a top tier journal in the Communications field - the International Journal of Communication

We got to present this in Manchester for the Digital Economies workshop organized by Richard Heeks, a fantastic platform for sharing this work.

The article, Crowdsourcing as a Platform for Digital Labor Unions is about how crowdsourcing is used as a tool to reconfigure relations between outsourced factory workers and corporations through innovative platform designs and the challenges that ensue. Below is the full abstract and link to the full paper:


Global complex supply chains have made it difficult to know the realities in factories.
This structure obfuscates the networks, channels, and flows of communication between
employers, workers, nongovernmental organizations and other vested intermediaries,
creating a lack of transparency. Factories operate far from the brands themselves, often
in developing countries where labor is cheap and regulations are weak. However, the
emergence of social media and mobile technology has drawn the world closer together.
Specifically, crowdsourcing is being used in an innovative way to gather feedback from
outsourced laborers with access to digital platforms. This article examines how
crowdsourcing platforms are used for both gathering and sharing information to foster
accountability. We critically assess how these tools enable dialogue between brands and
factory workers, making workers part of the greater conversation. We argue that
although there are challenges in designing and implementing these new monitoring
systems, these platforms can pave the path for new forms of unionization and corporate
social responsibility beyond just rebranding. 

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

New paper out on big data and the global South

My paper, "Bottom of the Data Pyramid, Big data and the Global South" has been published in the International Journal of Communication, an open access journal. This work is a build-up from the blog that I wrote earlier on regarding this topic for  Discover Society as well as a couple of keynotes I gave in 2015 at the Technology, Knowledge & Society Conference in Berkeley and IS4IS Summit in Vienna. 

Basically, this paper argues that so far, little attention has been given to the impact of big data in the Global South, about 60% of whose residents are below the poverty line. Big data manifests in novel and unprecedented ways in these neglected contexts. For instance, India has created biometric national identities for her 1.2 billion people, linking them to welfare schemes, and social entrepreneurial initiatives like the Ushahidi project that leveraged crowdsourcing to provide real-time crisis maps for humanitarian relief. While these projects are indeed inspirational, this article argues that in the context of the Global South there is a bias in the framing of big data as an instrument of empowerment. Here, the poor, or the “bottom of the pyramid” populace are the new consumer base, agents of social change instead of passive beneficiaries. This neoliberal outlook of big data facilitating inclusive capitalism for the common good sidelines critical perspectives urgently needed if we are to channel big data as a positive social force in emerging economies. This article proposes to assess these new technological developments through the lens of databased democracies, databased identities, and databased geographies to make evident normative assumptions and perspectives in this under-examined context.

Hope you enjoy the article.